Summer 2017

NURS 5339-002 Leadership for Quality, Safety and Health Policy

All students are responsible for checking their UTHSCSA Livemail account regularly (i.e., daily or several times every week) to obtain Official University Communication regarding their courses, program and student status.

COVID-19
Students are expected to follow all policies related to COVID-19 found on the university webpage: https://wp.uthscsa.edu/coronavirus/.


Check the schedule posted on the School of Nursing website, Schedules and Syllabi for recent updates on Class Dates and Classroom

The first class meeting will be on campus Monday, May 8, 2017 in the Academic Teaching & Learning Center,1:00 pm - 3:50 pm in Room 3303

The remaining on campus class dates are Mondays, June 5, and 26; July 10, and August 7, 2017

Refer to Canvas for additional information about pre class assignment and expectations. 

FACULTY CONTACT INFORMATION

Azizeh Sowan, PhD, RN
Assistant professor
School of Nursing, Suite 2.628
7703 Floyd Curl Dr. - MC 7975
UT Health San Antonio; San Antonio, TX 78229-3900
Office: (210) 567-5799; FAX: (210) 567-1719; Cell: 210-636-9975
sowan@uthscsa.edu
Office hours: By appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The principles, and factors germane to leadership will be explored in relation to complex organizations and the development of leadership styles and policy making within microsystems, mesosystems, and macrosystems to transform those healthcare systems.

CREDIT AND TIME ALLOCATION

Credit Hour Allocation: 3 semester credit hours
Clock Hour Allocation: 3 clock hours class (45 hours class)

PREREQUISITES

Graduate standing

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Upon completion of the Master of Science in Nursing Program (MSN) students will:

  1. Integrate scientific findings from nursing and related sciences, including genetics and genomics, into the delivery of advanced nursing care to populations in diverse settings.
  2. Demonstrate organizational and systems leadership to assure ethical and critical decision-making at all systems’ levels for quality and patient safety.
  3. Incorporate performance improvement strategies for quality, safety, and patient-centered care delivery.
  4. Use improvement science to achieve optimal patient care and care environment outcomes.
  5. Integrate meaningful and usable information systems and healthcare technologies to support safe, quality patient care and healthcare systems effectiveness.
  6. Advocate for policy changes that influence healthcare at appropriate levels.
  7. Lead interprofessional teams using collaborative strategies to effect quality patient care and population health outcomes.
  8. Analyze and incorporate broad ecological and social health determinants to design and deliver evidence-based clinical prevention and population healthcare and services to individuals, families, and aggregates/identified populations.
  9. Integrate the advanced competencies expected of a master’s prepared nurse to design, deliver, and evaluate outcomes of systems of care for individuals, families, and diverse populations.

COURSE OUTCOMES

  1. Examine theories and concepts related to leadership and organizational change. (Essentials I, II, IV, IX)
  2. Apply quality improvement models and processes to selected system changes for patient safety and quality outcomes. (Essential III)
  3. Analyze how various healthcare delivery systems are organized and regulated. (Essentials I, II, IV, IX)
  4. Formulate strategies for professional nurses to provide leadership in interprofessional teams in healthcare delivery systems. (Essential VII)
  5. Analyze ethical dilemmas encountered in direct and indirect advanced nursing practice. (Essentials II, IV)
  6. Analyze legal ramifications of prospective changes in healthcare delivery systems and professional nursing's scope of practice. (Essentials VI, VII, IX)
  7. Analyze the need for changes in healthcare systems based on systems outcomes data. (Essential VI)
  8. Design a plan to effect change in health policy with an identified population. (Essential VI)

CLINICAL OUTCOMES

N/A

GRADING SCALE FOR GRADUATE COURSES

A = 4 points (90-100)
B = 3 points (80-89)
C = 2 points (75-79)
D = 1 point (66-74)
F = 0 points (65 or below)

CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION / GRADES


2.5 points  - Participation in class discussion on campus

10 points   - Ethics Rounds Enrichment Activity

2.5 points  - Discussion online

30 points   - Reflection Journal

20 points   - Leadership Project

15 points   - Ethics Case Analysis

20 points   - Health Policy Project

CLASSROOM ATTENDANCE

Attendance in class is an expectation of each student.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

  1. If written assignments are made in a course they are required.
  2. Students are expected to submit written work on the scheduled date and time.
  3. The student must notify the course coordinator prior to the scheduled due date and time if they are unable to submit the written work as scheduled. Failure to make this notification in advance will result in a "zero" for that written work.
  4. If the excuse is accepted as reasonable and necessary, arrangements will be made for an alternative due date and time.
  5. Each student is responsible for making sure that he or she has completed the written work prior to submission.
  6. Late work will be accepted with consequences as outlined per course syllabi.

APA GUIDELINES

The APA Publication Manual 7th edition is required for use in all nursing school programs. 

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY

Students are expected to be above reproach in all scholastic activities. Students who engage in scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and dismissal from the university. "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, and submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts." Regents Rules and Regulations, Part One, Chapter VI, Section 3, Subsection 3.2, Subdivision 3.22.



PROFESSIONAL CODE OF CONDUCT

Students who are nurses or are preparing to enter the profession of nursing are expected to treat others with respect and compassion. “The principle of respect for persons extends to all individuals with whom the nurse interacts. The nurse maintains compassionate and caring relationships with colleagues and others with a commitment to the fair treatment of individuals, to integrity-preserving compromise and to resolving conflict. This standard of conduct precludes any and all prejudicial actions, any form of harassment or threatening behavior, or disregard for the effects of one’s actions on others” (American Nurses Association Code for Nurses, Interpretive Statement 1.5).

The students, faculty, Department Chairs, Associate Deans, and the Dean of the School of Nursing of the University Texas Health Science Center San Antonio subscribe to the highest standards of conduct. Our aim is professional behavior beyond reproach. Failure to abide by the signed code of professional conduct may lead to suspension and/or permanent dismissal from the UTHSCSA SON. In particular, we subscribe to the provisions of the Code of Ethics for Nurses (http://bit.ly/1mtD5p2) and the following points of conduct.

http://catalog.uthscsa.edu/schoolofnursing/policiesandprocedures/

School of Nursing Netiquette Guidelines for Online Interaction

Netiquette guidelines provide information for behaving properly online, when using email, tweets or texts so that you may successfully communicate your thoughts in a manner that is respectful and avoids misunderstandings with others.

ADA ACCOMMODATIONS

Any student seeking reasonable accommodations through the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact either the Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Services within the first week of the semester or schedule a meeting with the UTHSCSA ADA Compliance Office so that appropriate accommodations may be arranged. A request for accommodations (Form ADA-100: http://uthscsa.edu/eeo/form100-Faculty-student-resident.pdf) must be completed and submitted to the Executive Director of the ADA Compliance Office before accommodations can be provided. Additional information can be provided in the Student Success Center, Room 1.118 or through the ADA Compliance Office website: http://uthscsa.edu/eeo/request.asp.

REQUIRED TEXT / REFERENCE

Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality www.ahrq.gov

Beauchamp, T.L. & Childress, J.F. (2105) Principles of biomedical ethics (7th ed.) OUP USA ASIN: B00C6PNAFE

Fowler, M. (2015) Nursing's Social Policy Statement American Nurses Association, Silver Springs, MD ASIN: B016B16l9K

Fowler, M. Ed. (2015) guide to the code of ethics for nurses: Interpretation and application Silver Springs, MD ISBN 978-1558106031

Institute for Health Improvement (IHI) http://wwwihiorg/Pages/defaultaspx

Jonsen, A.R., Seigler, M., & Windslade, E.J. (2010 Clinical ethics A practical approach to ethical decisions in clinical medicine 7e Albert R http://depts.washington.edu/bioethx/tools/4boxes.html

Kouzes, J.M. & Posner, B.Z. (2012) The leadership challenge: How to make extraordinary things happen in organizations San Francisco: Jossey-Bass ISBN 13:978-040651728

Mason, D.J., Leavitt, J.K. & Chaffee, M.W. (2015) Policy and politics in nursing and health care (7th ed.) St Louis: Elsevier/W.B. Saunders ISBN-10:0323241441



RECOMMENDED (OPTIONAL) TEXT / REFERENCE


De Pree, M (2003). Leading without power Holland, MI: Shepard Foundation ISBN: 0-78879-8743-2

Kotter, J. (1999). What leaders really do Boston, MA: President and Fellows of Harvard College ISBN: 0-87584-897-4

Marquis, B.L. & Huston, C.J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing (8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health: ISBN 978-1-4511-9281-0

Nelson E.C., Batalden, P.B. & Lazar, J.S. eds. (2011) Value by design: Developing clinical microsystems to achieve organizational excellence. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass ISBN: 978-0-470-38534-0

Porter-O'Grady, T. & Malloch, K. (2015) quantum leadership Building better partnerships for sustainable health (4th ed.) Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett ISBN: 978-1-284-05068-4

CONTENT OUTLINE


1.Examine theories and concepts related to organizational change. (Essentials I, II, IV, IX)

2.Apply quality improvement models and processes to selected system changes for patient safety and quality outcomes. (Essential III)

3. Analyze how various healthcare delivery systems are organized and regulated. (Essentials I, II, IV, IX)

4. Formulate strategies for professional nurses to provide leadership in interprofessional teams in healthcare delivery systems. (Essential VII)

5. Analyze ethics dilemmas encountered in direct and indirect advanced nurses practice. (Essential II, IV))  

6. Analyze legal ramifications of prospective changes in healthcare delivery systems and professional nursing's scope of practice. (Essentials, VI VII IX)

7. Analyze the need for changes in healthcare systems based on systems outcomes data. (Essential VI)

8. Design a plan to effect change in health policy with an identified population. (Essential VI)

CALENDAR - 1st Day Only

Please check the schedule for recent updates on Class Dates & Room.


Check the class schedule on the School of Nursing website Schedules and Syllabi for recent updates to classes and classrooms

The first class day will be on campus Monday, May 8, 2017, 1:00 - 3:50 pm in Academic Teaching and Learning Center 3.3303.

Reading assignment for in class discussion:

Kouzes , J.M, & Posner, B.Z. (2012) The leadership challenge; how to make extraordinary things happen organizations. Chapter 1

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